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View Full Version : Amy Winehouse is dead



VanHooliganX
07-23-2011, 12:00 PM
Thought people would like to know.
So Amy finally had an OD.
Post your thoughts if you're fan of hers.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 03:09 PM
Cause of death is currently unk-no no no-wn.

Rich Cranium
07-23-2011, 03:11 PM
Is this even shocking?

Turns out she was 27 which was the age a lot of other musicians have died like Kurt Cobain, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and others.

helmsley
07-23-2011, 03:14 PM
i was hoping for her to live a little longer but........

its sad actually

WWTNA Mark
07-23-2011, 03:15 PM
Is this even shocking?

Of course it is. She was just 27 years old and was battling an addiction. Really sad to hear.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 03:17 PM
Of course it is. She was just 27 years old and was battling an addiction. Really sad to hear.
This.

Does something being foreseeable make it any less unfortunate? What compels everyone on the internet to keep bringing up the point that it should come as no surprise? I really don't get that.

RomanFlare
07-23-2011, 03:18 PM
Of course it is. She was just 27 years old and was battling an addiction. Really sad to hear.

Amy Winehouse was TWENTY-SEVEN?!? Holy shit, I thought she had to be at least 40 from how she looked!

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 03:22 PM
Amy Winehouse was TWENTY-SEVEN?!? Holy shit, I thought she had to be at least 40 from how she looked!
It's a shame what she let happen to herself. Girl used to be sort of a hottie.

http://mike100915.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/amy-winehouse-fat-thin.jpg

Rich Cranium
07-23-2011, 03:22 PM
This.

Does something being foreseeable make it any less unfortunate? What compels everyone on the internet to keep bringing up the point that it should come as no surprise? I really don't get that.

I am no psychic but whenever I saw her on TV, she was usually in an altered state. I remember telling someone that if she doesn't get the help she needs, it's going to end bad.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 03:28 PM
I am no psychic but whenever I saw her on TV, she was usually in an altered state. I remember telling someone that if she doesn't get the help she needs, it's going to end bad.
I'm still not seeing what's to be gained from pointing out that this is no surprise. Guess what? Fire is hot. Knowing this doesn't make it hurt any less when you get burned.

68wPayne
07-23-2011, 03:59 PM
It sucks anytime someone so young dies for any reason. Wish she would have gotten help. Unfortunate

THEKEVINBRAND
07-23-2011, 05:18 PM
sad to say, but i saw it coming

IPOOPINTHEBATH
07-23-2011, 05:28 PM
She just had to whore up the 27 Club.

el gabo
07-23-2011, 05:32 PM
Lohan should take notice. RIP.

No_1eddiefan
07-23-2011, 05:35 PM
It is a tragedy that she chose to live her life that way because she was always gonna die young. It's a waste of talent and rest in peace Amy Winehouse.

The Brown One
07-23-2011, 05:46 PM
Shocking to say the least for me. But it was inevitable.

YoungShaz11
07-23-2011, 05:51 PM
I dont like her , but I feel sorry for her . R.I.P Amy Winehouse she died so young

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 06:27 PM
I feel sorry for her family and friends, who ALL tried to help her. Ultimately she was too selfish to stop and see the impact of her actions on others.

If you want to destroy yourself bit by bit, fine....but keeping your loved ones close enough to you that they suffer with you is unfair and cruel.

She wasn't born with an addiction and she may have been introduced to drugs by her ex husband, but after all is said and done, she CHOSE to go down that route, nobody forced her to do it.

She was given help and offered help more times than I can count - the fact she has died at 27 is sad yes, but not shocking.

She had an average voice and was a talented lyricist, but her name doesn't belong alongside the greats who have also died at that age. Harsh, but realistic.

tad locust
07-23-2011, 06:29 PM
She was a great talent,May she Rest In Peace.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 06:44 PM
I feel sorry for her family and friends, who ALL tried to help her. Ultimately she was too selfish to stop and see the impact of her actions on others.

If you want to destroy yourself bit by bit, fine....but keeping your loved ones close enough to you that they suffer with you is unfair and cruel.

She wasn't born with an addiction and she may have been introduced to drugs by her ex husband, but after all is said and done, she CHOSE to go down that route, nobody forced her to do it.

She was given help and offered help more times than I can count - the fact she has died at 27 is sad yes, but not shocking.

She had an average voice and was a talented lyricist, but her name doesn't belong alongside the greats who have also died at that age. Harsh, but realistic.
http://www.addictionsandrecovery.org/


Addiction is like most major diseases. Consider heart disease, the leading cause of death in the developed world. It's partly due to genes and partly due to poor life style choices such as bad diet, lack of exercise, and smoking. The same is true for other common diseases like adult-onset diabetes. Many forms of cancers are due to a combination of genes and life style. But if your doctor said that you had diabetes or heart disease, you wouldn't think you were bad person. You would think, "What can I do to overcome this disease?" That is how you should approach addiction.

Addiction is not a weakness. The fact that addiction crosses all socio-economic boundaries confirms that addiction is a disease. People who don't know about addiction will tell you that you just need to be stronger to control your use. But if that was true then only unsuccessful people or unmotivated people would have an addiction, and yet 10% of high-functioning executives have an addiction.

If you think of addiction as a weakness, you'll paint yourself into a corner that you can't get out of. You'll focus on being stronger and trying to control your use, instead of treating addiction like a disease and focusing on stopping your use.

SESAfro
07-23-2011, 06:53 PM
Sad to say, this what happens when you don't go to rehab. I loved her voice and was surprise when I around out she was white. *tear*

el gabo
07-23-2011, 06:54 PM
I feel sorry for her family and friends, who ALL tried to help her. Ultimately she was too selfish to stop and see the impact of her actions on others.

If you want to destroy yourself bit by bit, fine....but keeping your loved ones close enough to you that they suffer with you is unfair and cruel.

She wasn't born with an addiction and she may have been introduced to drugs by her ex husband, but after all is said and done, she CHOSE to go down that route, nobody forced her to do it.

She was given help and offered help more times than I can count - the fact she has died at 27 is sad yes, but not shocking.

She had an average voice and was a talented lyricist, but her name doesn't belong alongside the greats who have also died at that age. Harsh, but realistic.

True. Harsh but true.

Hendrix was a guitar god.
Kurt was just an amazing talent. Goes to show how shallow music has become. It's now called the music business.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 07:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ

I'm not even a fan, but to suggest this girl's voice was anywhere in the realm of average is all sorts of crazy.

el gabo
07-23-2011, 07:06 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ

I'm not even a fan, but to suggest this girl's voice was anywhere in the realm of average is all sorts of crazy.

I liked her voice. It was... soulful if it makes any sense. Just don't think she was as talented as the above mentioned.

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 07:15 PM
I'm not even a fan, but to suggest this girl's voice was anywhere in the realm of average is all sorts of crazy.


http://www.addictionsandrecovery.org/

With all due respect Sir, that's a matter of opinion and my not happening to think that she was anything more than an average soul/blues singer is in no way 'crazy'.

I am aware of the explainations and literature on addiction. It still does not change the fact that it was her choice to go down that route in the first place. Addiction may be a disease, I happen to think it's a poor excuse for bad behaviour, but that's my opinion, not necessarily what others may think and as always, I respect what other people may think or believe, but to become addicted you first have to make the conscious choice to do something or try something for the first time, or the addiction will never take hold.

Amy made the choice to take drugs for the first time, whether you become addicted or not, she made the choice to do it. My sympathies are with her family, not her. Sorry if that doesn't sit well with you, but that's how I feel. My opinions are not meant to offend anyone.

Kashdinero
07-23-2011, 07:18 PM
I'm of the opinion that she was at one point in her life one of the best music artists on the planet. She more than deserves her place amongst the greats. I'm almost in tears as I type this... So talented, so wasted.

She had more downs than ups, but as low as she fell there was a time when she reached levels of greatness that very few will ever achieve. She may have not sustained her top form for a long period of time, but when she was on she was a vocal godess. Sappy, but true :)

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 07:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ

I'm not even a fan, but to suggest this girl's voice was anywhere in the realm of average is all sorts of crazy.


http://www.addictionsandrecovery.org/


I'm of the opinion that she was at one point in her life one of the best music artists on the planet. She more than deserves her place amongst the greats. I'm almost in tears as I type this... So talented, so wasted.

She had more downs than ups, but as low as she fell there was a time when she reached levels of greatness that very few will ever achieve. She may have not sustained her top form for a long period of time, but when she was on she was a vocal godess. Sappy, but true :)

Awe Kash.......bless ya!

I feel like this whenever I think of Lennon.....so, even though I'm not a fan of Miss Winehouse, I know what you're saying.....

Psst....people will start thinking Londoners are soft if you confess to tears again though lol

HeelTurn
07-23-2011, 07:28 PM
Awe Kash.......bless ya!

I feel like this whenever I think of Lennon.....so, even though I'm not a fan of Miss Winehouse, I know what you're saying.....

Psst....people will start thinking Londoners are soft if you confess to tears again though lol


Sissy Southerners lol

Yeah I can see what you both mean, never nice when someone young dies. Talented and tormented.

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 07:31 PM
Sissy Southerners lol


That's fighting talk lol.....

Kashdinero
07-23-2011, 07:37 PM
Awe Kash.......bless ya!

I feel like this whenever I think of Lennon.....so, even though I'm not a fan of Miss Winehouse, I know what you're saying.....

Psst....people will start thinking Londoners are soft if you confess to tears again though lol

Soft? The second a KashDinero tear touched the ground the entire planet would split in two!

But me welling up for the girl shows character (:)) and respect for what she actually must have gone through during some of her worst and final moments. I have known more than a few people like her, and I guess I can relate is all.

*flexes muscles and once again resumes his manly stature*

Rich Cranium
07-23-2011, 07:48 PM
It is indeed a sad situation that she obviously had those in her life willing to get her the help she needed and deserved. Perhaps she may have tried a treatment program or intervention of sorts, but idk. Sometimes, when people are sick, it's really difficult to give up on your addiction and that you feel you are not harming anyone when you are in fact harming yourself. It's up to the person to accept the help offered.

When I stated in an earlier post that if she didn't receive/accept help, I could envision a bad ending, that was the truth. I said similar things regarding Lindsay Lohan. If she doesn't accept help, it's not going to be pretty.

WWTNA Mark
07-23-2011, 07:57 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Ye5T66K4PTQ

I'm not even a fan, but to suggest this girl's voice was anywhere in the realm of average is all sorts of crazy.

Yeah, she really did have a unique voice.

68wPayne
07-23-2011, 08:03 PM
have to see it is suprising to see all you Englanders expressing such admiration for her. She was really nothing more than a 1 or 2 hit wonder over here, so I never really heard any of her other stuff. I guess I should check her out.

SESAfro
07-23-2011, 08:13 PM
have to see it is suprising to see all you Englanders expressing such admiration for her. She was really nothing more than a 1 or 2 hit wonder over here, so I never really heard any of her other stuff. I guess I should check her out.
That's because she wasn't "poppy" enough. Unlike most, I loved her.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 08:27 PM
With all due respect Sir, that's a matter of opinion and my not happening to think that she was anything more than an average soul/blues singer is in no way 'crazy'.
My apologies, but the "harsh, but realistic" comment made it seem as if you were positing something as fact, which is basically of the same thing that I just did and you objected to that.

The girl is/was widely regarded amongst peers and industry professionals as the finest soul singer of her generation, and she didn't attain that sort of recognition without there being good reason. If someone wants to paint her as being average then that's totally their right, yes, but I can't help but question it when it's met with a whole lot of empirical evidence pointing to the contrary.

In the interest of fairness and subjectivity, though, let's just agree to disagree and all of that.


I am aware of the explainations and literature on addiction. It still does not change the fact that it was her choice to go down that route in the first place. Addiction may be a disease, I happen to think it's a poor excuse for bad behaviour, but that's my opinion, not necessarily what others may think and as always, I respect what other people may think or believe, but to become addicted you first have to make the conscious choice to do something or try something for the first time, or the addiction will never take hold.

Amy made the choice to take drugs for the first time, whether you become addicted or not, she made the choice to do it. My sympathies are with her family, not her. Sorry if that doesn't sit well with you, but that's how I feel. My opinions are not meant to offend anyone.

I'm not offended, so don't worry about apologizing. I just wish more people had a clear understanding of how addiction actually works, and I think demonizing an individual for circumstances one's not entirely privy to is a huge disservice to the addict in question as well as the entire situation. There's nothing to be gained for laying any sort of blame on anyone, and I'd venture to guess that even her loved ones are able to see through that despite whatever intense pain they're likely currently experiencing (as those close to addiction often have a better understanding of the actual complexities involved).

People don't make a conscious decision to become consumed with addiction; that's just not how it works. It might be an easier concept for some to digest, but there simply isn't any truth to it.

Regardless, I appreciate the mature response. The board could use more people able to separate their emotions from their opinions and engage in difficult discussions, so good on you for keeping things cordial and adult.

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 08:38 PM
In the interest of fairness and subjectivity, though, let's just agree to disagree and all of that.


I'm not offended, so don't worry about apologizing. I just wish more people had a clear understanding of how addiction actually works, and I think demonizing an individual for circumstances one's not entirely privy to is a huge disservice to the addict in question as well as the entire situation. There's nothing to be gained for laying any sort of blame on anyone, and I'd venture to guess that even her loved ones are able to see through that despite whatever intense pain they're likely currently experiencing (as those close to addiction often have a better understanding of the actual complexities involved).

People don't make a conscious decision to become consumed with addiction; that's just not how it works. It might be an easier concept for some to digest, but there simply isn't any truth to it.

Regardless, I appreciate the mature response. The board could use more people able to separate their emotions from their opinions and engage in difficult discussions, so good on you for keeping things cordial and adult.


That's a fair call.

Unfortunately, there is a history of addiction and substance abuse by people very close to me and my family. I know addiction and the strangle hold of drugs only too well.
I would never post a comment on a subject of which I have no knowledge of Sir, to do so would invalidate the argument in my eyes. This is my opinion however.
The subject is sensitive to many. A family member of mine died in nigh on the same circumstances as Miss Winehouse. We tried to help him and, in a time of clarity for him, he told us he'd rather risk the addiction than have to worry about our opinions and refused all help. I lost respect for him and I reacted to his death the same way I reacted to Amy's. I may be a lot of things, but two faced and contradictary, I am not.

Far too often we see things escalate too far due to people not being able to keep their emotions in check before a response. I am fortunate that my upbringing has allowed me the good grace to read and reflect before I reply.
We may not always agree on subjects, but you can always be assured of an adult response from me Sir.

xtremetothemax
07-23-2011, 08:44 PM
man thats sad to hear. i just heard about it too. I was surprised when i heard she died. R.I.P Amy Winehouse.

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 08:50 PM
That's a fair call.

Unfortunately, there is a history of addiction and substance abuse by people very close to me and my family. I know addiction and the strangle hold of drugs only too well.
I would never post a comment on a subject of which I have no knowledge of Sir, to do so would invalidate the argument in my eyes. This is my opinion however.
The subject is sensitive to many. A family member of mine died in nigh on the same circumstances as Miss Winehouse. We tried to help him and, in a time of clarity for him, he told us he'd rather risk the addiction than have to worry about our opinions and refused all help. I lost respect for him and I reacted to his death the same way I reacted to Amy's. I may be a lot of things, but two faced and contradictary, I am not.

Far too often we see things escalate too far due to people not being able to keep their emotions in check before a response. I am fortunate that my upbringing has allowed me the good grace to read and reflect before I reply.
We may not always agree on subjects, but you can always be assured of an adult response from me Sir.
Quit calling me sir. You're making me feel old. ;)

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 08:59 PM
have to see it is suprising to see all you Englanders expressing such admiration for her. She was really nothing more than a 1 or 2 hit wonder over here, so I never really heard any of her other stuff. I guess I should check her out.
Actually, in the U.S. she released 5 hit singles and her album, Back to Black, went double platinum. She also tied the record for second-most Grammy awards won in a single year with wins for Best New Artist, Best Female Pop Vocal Performance, Best Pop Vocal Album, Song of the Year, and Record of the Year.

Polly-Pablo
07-23-2011, 09:09 PM
Quit calling me sir. You're making me feel old. ;)

Ha ha - sorry.....it's the military life that does that to me. It's a sign of respect, but out of your respect for your request, I will cease.:)

Iron Ape
07-23-2011, 09:11 PM
Ha ha - sorry.....it's the military life that does that to me. It's a sign of respect, but out of your respect for your request, I will cease.:)
It's all good. I was only half joking anyways.

*salutes Polly*

CMRyder
07-23-2011, 11:35 PM
Sad. Drugs are bad people.

Iron Ape
07-24-2011, 11:43 AM
Here's a fantastically written piece from Russell Brand (for those of you not allergic to words):


For Amy

When you love someone who suffers from the disease of addiction you await the phone call. There will be a phone call. The sincere hope is that the call will be from the addict themselves, telling you they've had enough, that they're ready to stop, ready to try something new. Of course though, you fear the other call, the sad nocturnal chime from a friend or relative telling you it's too late, she's gone.

Frustratingly it's not a call you can ever make it must be received. It is impossible to intervene.

I've known Amy Winehouse for years. When I first met her around Camden she was just some twit in a pink satin jacket shuffling round bars with mutual friends, most of whom were in cool Indie bands or peripheral Camden figures Withnail-ing their way through life on impotent charisma. Carl Barrat told me that "Winehouse" (which I usually called her and got a kick out of cos it's kind of funny to call a girl by her surname) was a jazz singer, which struck me as a bizarrely anomalous in that crowd. To me with my limited musical knowledge this information placed Amy beyond an invisible boundary of relevance; "Jazz singer? She must be some kind of eccentric" I thought. I chatted to her anyway though, she was after all, a girl, and she was sweet and peculiar but most of all vulnerable.

I was myself at that time barely out of rehab and was thirstily seeking less complicated women so I barely reflected on the now glaringly obvious fact that Winehouse and I shared an affliction, the disease of addiction. All addicts, regardless of the substance or their social status share a consistent and obvious symptom; they're not quite present when you talk to them. They communicate to you through a barely discernible but un-ignorable veil. Whether a homeless smack head troubling you for 50p for a cup of tea or a coked-up, pinstriped exec foaming off about his "speedboat" there is a toxic aura that prevents connection. They have about them the air of elsewhere, that they're looking through you to somewhere else they'd rather be. And of course they are. The priority of any addict is to anaesthetise the pain of living to ease the passage of the day with some purchased relief.

From time to time I'd bump into Amy she had good banter so we could chat a bit and have a laugh, she was "a character" but that world was riddled with half cut, doped up chancers, I was one of them, even in early recovery I was kept afloat only by clinging to the bodies of strangers so Winehouse, but for her gentle quirks didn't especially register.

Then she became massively famous and I was pleased to see her acknowledged but mostly baffled because I'd not experienced her work and this not being the 1950's I wondered how a "jazz singer" had achieved such cultural prominence. I wasn't curious enough to do anything so extreme as listen to her music or go to one of her gigs, I was becoming famous myself at the time and that was an all consuming experience. It was only by chance that I attended a Paul Weller gig at the Roundhouse that I ever saw her live.

I arrived late and as I made my way to the audience through the plastic smiles and plastic cups I heard the rolling, wondrous resonance of a female vocal. Entering the space I saw Amy on stage with Weller and his band; and then the awe. The awe that envelops when witnessing a genius. From her oddly dainty presence that voice, a voice that seemed not to come from her but from somewhere beyond even Billie and Ella, from the font of all greatness. A voice that was filled with such power and pain that it was at once entirely human yet laced with the divine. My ears, my mouth, my heart and mind all instantly opened. Winehouse. Winehouse? Winehouse! That twerp, all eyeliner and lager dithering up Chalk Farm Road under a back-combed barnet, the lips that I'd only seen clenching a fishwife fag and dribbling curses now a portal for this holy sound. So now I knew. She wasn't just some hapless wannabe, yet another pissed up nit who was never gonna make it, nor was she even a ten-a-penny-chanteuse enjoying her fifteen minutes. She was a f**king genius.

Shallow fool that I am I now regarded her in a different light, the light that blazed down from heaven when she sang. That lit her up now and a new phase in our friendship began. She came on a few of my TV and radio shows, I still saw her about but now attended to her with a little more interest. Publicly though, Amy increasingly became defined by her addiction. Our media though is more interested in tragedy than talent, so the ink began to defect from praising her gift to chronicling her downfall. The destructive personal relationships, the blood soaked ballet slippers, the aborted shows, that youtube madness with the baby mice. In the public perception this ephemeral tittle-tattle replaced her timeless talent. This and her manner in our occasional meetings brought home to me the severity of her condition. Addiction is a serious disease; it will end with jail, mental institutions or death. I was 27 years old when through the friendship and help of Chip Somers of the treatment centre, Focus12 I found recovery, through Focus I was introduced to support fellowships for alcoholics and drug addicts which are very easy to find and open to anybody with a desire to stop drinking and without which I would not be alive.

Now Amy Winehouse is dead, like many others whose unnecessary deaths have been retrospectively romanticised, at 27 years old. Whether this tragedy was preventable or not is now irrelevant. It is not preventable today. We have lost a beautiful and talented woman to this disease. Not all addicts have Amy's incredible talent. Or Kurt's or Jimi's or Janis's, some people just get the affliction. All we can do is adapt the way we view this condition, not as a crime or a romantic affectation but as a disease that will kill. We need to review the way society treats addicts, not as criminals but as sick people in need of care. We need to look at the way our government funds rehabilitation. It is cheaper to rehabilitate an addict than to send them to prison, so criminalisation doesn't even make economic sense. Not all of us know someone with the incredible talent that Amy had but we all know drunks and junkies and they all need help and the help is out there. All they have to do is pick up the phone and make the call. Or not. Either way, there will be a phone call.

Markedoutforlife
07-24-2011, 11:53 AM
Well done mr ape!
Russel brand was the perfect person to speak on this and im glad you have shared this with us all.

IPOOPINTHEBATH
07-24-2011, 01:46 PM
Sad. Drugs are bad people.

Drug use is fine, drug abuse is bad.

sincara
07-24-2011, 01:59 PM
she only proformed on wednesday at the i tunes festival
rip amy winehouse

Grind_Bastard
07-24-2011, 04:01 PM
Though I'm not a fan of hers, she had great talent, and made good music, much above the average shit that you can hear in the world of music. RIP Amy Winehouse.

IronApem thanks for sharing Russell Brand's text, an excellent read. BTW, if people could debate like you and Polly, the Internet forums would be much enjoyable. Not that they are not, but there won't be as many foolish discussions.

HCollins-TNA1
07-24-2011, 04:37 PM
Sad as it is....

But it really don't surprise me, Amy battled more Demons then anything with her addictions....
She was a talented person and was very pretty at times.... But she had a a lot going on...

xAzureSkye
07-24-2011, 04:43 PM
Not a fan of her music, but it's sad to see someone die so young. I have never touched drugs in my life and after this.. I don't think I ever will

IrkenInvader
07-24-2011, 10:15 PM
Drug use is fine, drug abuse is bad.

That's a fine line to walk.