PDA

View Full Version : Drivers Test



Broc
12-18-2011, 10:31 PM
So I'm taking my permit test pretty soon, so that inspired me for this thread.

how old were you when you got your permit? How many times did you have to take the permit test? how old were you when you got your license? and how many times did you have to take that test

Bodom
12-18-2011, 10:38 PM
The driving tests these days are graded on a point system. So hit as much stuff as possible. Double points for bicyclists and old ladies.

Broc
12-18-2011, 10:40 PM
The driving tests these days are graded on a point system. So hit as much stuff as possible. Double points for bicyclists and old ladies.

I will keep that in mind when I take the test :p

THEKEVINBRAND
12-18-2011, 10:53 PM
this is how we roll in Ontario:

Graduated Licensing System for Passenger Vehicles

Learner's permit (G1): Available at the age of 16, with the passing of a multiple choice road theory test and an eye vision test, a G1 licence is issued which allows the learning driver to drive on roads accompanied by someone with full valid driver's licence whose blood alcohol content (BAC) is less than 0.05 and has been licensed for four years. The driver also cannot drive on 400-series highways and other high-speed expressways (unless accompanied by a licensed instructor) or between 12:00 AM – 5:00 AM and must maintain their own BAC at zero.
Probationary licence (G2): Available after having held a G1 licence for 12 months, or eight months if the driver has completed and passed a ministry-approved driver education course. Probationary licence is acquired after successfully completing a road test. At this point, the driver must still maintain a BAC of zero. As of September, 2005, teenage drivers with a G2 licence are restricted in the number of passengers under 19 that they can carry during night-time driving.[20]
Full licence (G): After 1 year of possessing the G2 licence, a driver can take an additional road test that often includes driving on a four lane divided highway. With successful completion, they will obtain a full licence, which carries no restrictions and are not required to take any further tests until the age of 80, provided they renew their licence every five years.[21] Drivers aged 21 and under must still have a blood alcohol level of 0, even with a full G license. Drivers 80 and over must complete a vision and knowledge test and participate in a 90-minute group education session to renew their licence, and the maximum number of years that a licence can be issued for is two years.
Graduated Licensing System for Motorcycles:

Class M1: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Level 1 of graduated licensing. Holders may drive a motorcycle under certain conditions, which are: Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) must be zero, riders can only ride during daylight hours (1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset), cannot ride on any highway with speeds of greater than 80 km/h except Highways 11, 17, 61, 69, 71, 101, 102, 144 and 655 and no passengers.
Class M2: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Level 2 of graduated licensing. Holders may drive a motorcycle but only with a zero blood alcohol level. Holders may also drive a Class G vehicle under the conditions that apply to a class G1 licence holder.
Class M2 with Condition L: Limited-speed motorcycle (LSM) or moped only
Class M: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Holders may also drive a Class G vehicle under the conditions that apply to a class G1 licence holder
Class M with Condition L: Limited-speed motorcycle (LSM) or mopeds only. Limited-speed motorcycles are motorcycles with a maximum speed of 70 km/h. If manufactured after 1988 they are identified by a label on the vehicle that indicates it to be a "LSM/MVL".
Additional Licensing Types for Ontario:

Class F: Regular bus maximum of 24 passenger capacity and ambulances. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'G'
Class E: School purposes bus - maximum of 24 passenger capacity. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'F' and 'G'
Class D: Any truck or motor vehicle combination exceeding 11,000 kg provided the towed vehicle is not over 4,600 kg. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'G'
Class C: Any regular bus with designed seating capacity for more than 24 passengers. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'D', 'F' and 'G'
Class B: Any school purposes bus with designed seating capacity for more than 24 passengers. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' and 'G'
Class A with Condition R: Drivers with a restricted Class A licence condition would be prevented from operating a motor vehicle pulling double trailers or a motor vehicle pulling a trailer with air-brakes.
Class A: Any tractor-trailer or combination of motor vehicle and towed vehicles where the towed vehicles exceed a total gross weight of 4,600 kilograms. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'A with Condition R', 'D' and 'G'
Ontario has used a graduated licensing system since 1994. A driver can take as little as 20 months to get a full licence, however a driver must have a full (G) licence within five years of obtaining a learners permit (G1).

In 2006, Ontario passed legislation that would allow a court to suspend the licence of high school dropout until they turn 18. But the Act did not received royal assent until December 2009 and is now in effect.[22][23]

Traffic violation convictions usually come with demerit points against your licence. While the demerit points have no official impact on insurance rates, most insurance providers will increase the rate charged to a driver in response to demerit points. The demerit points are used by the Ministry of Transportation to determine licence suspensions due to repeated traffic violations (Effects on Ontario insurance rates and eligibility are typically measured by the number of tickets received in recent years, rather than the associated points).

Drivers from out of province must obtain an Ontario driver's licence if staying more than 90 days. New residents must apply after 60 days of living in Ontario.

Starting June 2009, Ontario began issuing Enhanced Drivers Licences (EDLs) as an option to residents upon request. These licence while almost visually identical to regular drivers licences contained 2 distinct differences. The first being a machine readable code printed on the back of the card (visually similar to the same coding on a Canadian Passport). The second: an embedded RFID microchip. These changes were made in response to the heightened security precautions at US land border crossings. The changes allow for quicker procedures at a border crossing as well as a cheaper alternative to a Canadian Passport ($40 vs. $100).

Broc
12-18-2011, 10:56 PM
this is how we roll in Ontario:

Graduated Licensing System for Passenger Vehicles

Learner's permit (G1): Available at the age of 16, with the passing of a multiple choice road theory test and an eye vision test, a G1 licence is issued which allows the learning driver to drive on roads accompanied by someone with full valid driver's licence whose blood alcohol content (BAC) is less than 0.05 and has been licensed for four years. The driver also cannot drive on 400-series highways and other high-speed expressways (unless accompanied by a licensed instructor) or between 12:00 AM – 5:00 AM and must maintain their own BAC at zero.
Probationary licence (G2): Available after having held a G1 licence for 12 months, or eight months if the driver has completed and passed a ministry-approved driver education course. Probationary licence is acquired after successfully completing a road test. At this point, the driver must still maintain a BAC of zero. As of September, 2005, teenage drivers with a G2 licence are restricted in the number of passengers under 19 that they can carry during night-time driving.[20]
Full licence (G): After 1 year of possessing the G2 licence, a driver can take an additional road test that often includes driving on a four lane divided highway. With successful completion, they will obtain a full licence, which carries no restrictions and are not required to take any further tests until the age of 80, provided they renew their licence every five years.[21] Drivers aged 21 and under must still have a blood alcohol level of 0, even with a full G license. Drivers 80 and over must complete a vision and knowledge test and participate in a 90-minute group education session to renew their licence, and the maximum number of years that a licence can be issued for is two years.
Graduated Licensing System for Motorcycles:

Class M1: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Level 1 of graduated licensing. Holders may drive a motorcycle under certain conditions, which are: Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) must be zero, riders can only ride during daylight hours (1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset), cannot ride on any highway with speeds of greater than 80 km/h except Highways 11, 17, 61, 69, 71, 101, 102, 144 and 655 and no passengers.
Class M2: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Level 2 of graduated licensing. Holders may drive a motorcycle but only with a zero blood alcohol level. Holders may also drive a Class G vehicle under the conditions that apply to a class G1 licence holder.
Class M2 with Condition L: Limited-speed motorcycle (LSM) or moped only
Class M: Motorcycles, including a limited-speed motorcycle (motor scooter) and a motor-assisted bicycle (moped). Holders may also drive a Class G vehicle under the conditions that apply to a class G1 licence holder
Class M with Condition L: Limited-speed motorcycle (LSM) or mopeds only. Limited-speed motorcycles are motorcycles with a maximum speed of 70 km/h. If manufactured after 1988 they are identified by a label on the vehicle that indicates it to be a "LSM/MVL".
Additional Licensing Types for Ontario:

Class F: Regular bus maximum of 24 passenger capacity and ambulances. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'G'
Class E: School purposes bus - maximum of 24 passenger capacity. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'F' and 'G'
Class D: Any truck or motor vehicle combination exceeding 11,000 kg provided the towed vehicle is not over 4,600 kg. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'G'
Class C: Any regular bus with designed seating capacity for more than 24 passengers. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'D', 'F' and 'G'
Class B: Any school purposes bus with designed seating capacity for more than 24 passengers. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' and 'G'
Class A with Condition R: Drivers with a restricted Class A licence condition would be prevented from operating a motor vehicle pulling double trailers or a motor vehicle pulling a trailer with air-brakes.
Class A: Any tractor-trailer or combination of motor vehicle and towed vehicles where the towed vehicles exceed a total gross weight of 4,600 kilograms. Can also operate vehicles in Class 'A with Condition R', 'D' and 'G'
Ontario has used a graduated licensing system since 1994. A driver can take as little as 20 months to get a full licence, however a driver must have a full (G) licence within five years of obtaining a learners permit (G1).

In 2006, Ontario passed legislation that would allow a court to suspend the licence of high school dropout until they turn 18. But the Act did not received royal assent until December 2009 and is now in effect.[22][23]

Traffic violation convictions usually come with demerit points against your licence. While the demerit points have no official impact on insurance rates, most insurance providers will increase the rate charged to a driver in response to demerit points. The demerit points are used by the Ministry of Transportation to determine licence suspensions due to repeated traffic violations (Effects on Ontario insurance rates and eligibility are typically measured by the number of tickets received in recent years, rather than the associated points).

Drivers from out of province must obtain an Ontario driver's licence if staying more than 90 days. New residents must apply after 60 days of living in Ontario.

Starting June 2009, Ontario began issuing Enhanced Drivers Licences (EDLs) as an option to residents upon request. These licence while almost visually identical to regular drivers licences contained 2 distinct differences. The first being a machine readable code printed on the back of the card (visually similar to the same coding on a Canadian Passport). The second: an embedded RFID microchip. These changes were made in response to the heightened security precautions at US land border crossings. The changes allow for quicker procedures at a border crossing as well as a cheaper alternative to a Canadian Passport ($40 vs. $100).

hmm, I get the feeling you C&Pd that, and not giving credit to your source? and you call Ryan Clark the bad guy

Giddy
12-18-2011, 11:16 PM
hmm, i get the feeling you c&pd that, and not giving credit to your source? And you call ryan clark the bad guy
DON DON DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONNNNNNNNNNNN
http://gifs.gifbin.com/sw80757499.gif

TheMover
12-19-2011, 01:11 AM
Oh man, good luck for it. I was 17 when I was fully able to drive, I'm not 100% sure what the differences are between us (I'm in the UK) but yeah. Took my final test twice and overall, I began learning in very late June and passed mid-February.

A bus was my downfall the first time. To hell with buses.

If it gives you any confidence, one of my best friends failed his first test with 18 Major faults. Considering you only need one to fail, I'm surprised as heck the examiner didn't stop him. Maybe he was going for a high score?

Broc
12-19-2011, 01:27 AM
So by what I've been told the permit test is mostly just common sense, and not that much on actual studying, but regardless, I've been reading the manual for about a month, I haven't gotten to far though, I probably finished about half of it, if that

Dameduse823
12-19-2011, 02:04 AM
I'm not sure if its the same everywhere but in ny you have to take a written test for your permit which is pretty simple just basic rules of teh road questions. The drivers test itself I had to do twice and basically just drove around for five minutes with teh instructor telling me what to do. Failed teh first one miserably

Iron Ape
12-19-2011, 02:12 AM
hmm, I get the feeling you C&Pd that, and not giving credit to your source? and you call Ryan Clark the bad guy
Boom. Roasted.

SilverGhost
12-19-2011, 02:20 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMRIyKuaTPc

steveorton
12-19-2011, 07:55 AM
I was seventeen when I got mine. The important thing is to remain calm and collected. Practice, Practice, Practice and Good Luck :D

Tommy Thunder
12-19-2011, 08:05 AM
16 when I passed my theory test, 17 when I passed my driving test (2nd time, was failed for speeding the first time lol).

Grind_Bastard
12-19-2011, 11:52 AM
You should drink a couple of jagerbombs first, they say.

I have no driver's license.

THEKEVINBRAND
12-19-2011, 10:19 PM
hmm, I get the feeling you C&Pd that, and not giving credit to your source? and you call Ryan Clark the bad guy

of course I C&P'd it from my driver's handbook

SouthernBlood
12-19-2011, 11:54 PM
You should drink a couple of jagerbombs first, they say.

I have no driver's license.

me either,It aint no sweat,Ive just gotta get all my other affairs in order first

Broc
12-20-2011, 12:41 AM
of course I C&P'd it from my driver's handbook

and you didn't site your source, tisk, tisk, tisk.

THEKEVINBRAND
12-20-2011, 12:49 AM
and you didn't site your source, tisk, tisk, tisk.

the ontario driver's handbook? it's a known fact and of course that's not my work it can't be

HolyJose2391
12-20-2011, 01:21 AM
It was the day before my 17th birthday that ingot my permit I had failed three times because of the signs